What Is An Audio Interface? Everything You Need To Know

Audio Interface Header

So, what is an audio interface and why do you need one? Being artistic and creative is super beneficial for the soul and wellbeing. Whether you’re just starting out playing your own music, or you have a few songs under your belt, the next step in your musical career is learning how to record yourself playing. To do this, you need a special tool called an audio interface. 

Read on to learn everything you need to know about how digital audio interfaces work and how to choose the right one for your recordings.

What Is An Audio Interface?

The Simplest Explanation Is:

An audio interface is a sound card that manages inputs and outputs going between your computer and instrument (or microphone). In the past, studio engineers would use internal sound cards in their desktop computers to manage inputs and outputs.

Audio Interface v Sound Card

Internal soundcards were limited by the size and capabilities of the computer, so today we rely on external sound cards to do the job. These external sound cards are called audio interfaces.

It is important to note that many computers still have sound cards that are used for basic speaker and headphone functions, but they do not provide the necessary inputs for instruments and microphones that you will need if you wish to record.

What Does An Audio Interface Do?

As mentioned above, an audio interface manages the sounds coming and going from your computer when you are recording. For instance, when you strum your guitar or sing into a microphone, you are producing a sound wave or signal that travels by cable into the interface. The audio interface takes that information and turns it into a digital format that can be used by your computer, allowing you to break the sound down and edit it using a digital audio workstation, or DAW on your computer.

Likewise, when you’re editing or adding new tracks to your recording, you will want the ability to playback. This process is also handled by the audio interface (aka a recording interface), which takes the digital recording from your computer, converts it back into an analog signal, and sends it out to your monitors or speakers.

Do I Need An Audio Interface for Recording?

Whether or not you need a digital audio interface for recording depends on what equipment you currently have. These days, some microphones and other music cables come with a USB attachment that already has an audio interface built-in. If you have a device like this, you may be able to plug your device straight into your computer and start recording.

However, most people do not have adapters or cables with a built-in interface for their guitars or other instruments. Besides, the built-in audio interfaces used in these cheaper microphones and devices will not give you the highest quality recording. The true audio interface offers you a variety of controls and options. This helps you get the best sound into your computer the first time, whereas built-in interfaces are simply made to transfer sound for basic voice recordings.

Ultimately, if you want to make high quality recordings of yourself playing music, it is worth the investment to get a real audio interface to work with.

What Else Can An Audio Interface Do?

Multiple Inputs

Aside from converting your analog sound signals into digital files for your computer, a quality audio interface can also perform a handful of other tasks. For instance, it will allow you to add multiple inputs at one time, such as a guitar and a microphone. Secondly, it will allow you to adjust the gain, or signal strength of your inputs independently. So you can get the sound and balance you’re looking for during the recording process. This is done with the help of pre-amplifiers and other components that are only found in an audio interface, built for this purpose.

Layer Tracks 

Another helpful feature in your audio interface. It can take tracks you’ve already recorded, and play them back to you while you record another layer on top. This allows you to build tracks on your own whilst ensuring you’re synched in time. In the early stages, this playback can help you practice with a backing track or experiment with additional tracks that you may want to record later on.

Audio Interface With Phantom Power

Some digital audio interfaces also provide phantom power to condenser microphones and MIDI control slots for keyboards and other MIDI devices. They can also manage multiple playback streams with headphones and studio monitors

What Is The Best Audio Interface?

The best audio interface for you will largely depend on the type of recording you wish to do, but as you are doing research, you should be paying close attention to the various input/output configurations available. At the entry-level, there are many affordable audio interfaces that provide two channels of input, usually for a microphone and instrument. However, high-end products can have dozens of inputs for recording many instruments and microphones at once.

If you plan on recording yourself playing and singing, you may only need two inputs. But if you have a whole band to record at the same time, it’s probably a good idea to look into extra inputs of various types to cover all bases.

Another consideration when choosing your interface, is whether you plan on plugging your instrument directly into the input, or do you plan on using your own amplifier and pedals? If you require it for the latter, you will want to use the line in function of your audio interface. If you decide to record directly from your instrument, you will still have the opportunity to change the sound in the DAW to add effects later.

Finally, when choosing an audio interface, you need to know what kind of input your computer can accept and what type of output the device is using. Common options include USB, Thunderbolt, Firewire, and PCIe. Each of these connection types has its own advantages and disadvantages, but your computer is likely already set up to handle one or two. PCIe is a card-based standard that is not available on laptops, whereas USB is universal. If you do not have the proper connection, you may need to purchase an adapter to make your audio interface work with your computer, laptop, or tablet.

 

An Audio Interface is ideal for home recording

How Do I Compare Audio Interfaces?

After you have decided what kind of inputs and outputs you want, the next step in choosing an audio interface is comparing the other features available. For instance, an audio interface with a 48V button is made for handling condenser microphones. Microphone pre-amps are also an important feature if you will be recording vocals or instruments from microphones that do not produce a strong enough signal on their own for recording.

In addition, you should check whether the interface is balanced or unbalanced. An unbalanced interface may save you money upfront, but it can also cause ground loop problems and interference if you aren’t careful. It is often better to spend the extra money on a balanced option so you don’t have to worry about this while you’re learning.

The ‘sample rate’ is another key feature to compare. A higher sample rate means that your interface is taking more snapshots of the signal you produce, and sending more information to your computer. This ensures that the recording you make is accurate and of high quality. A lower sample rate may cause your recordings to sound less “full”.

Finally, you will want to look at ‘latency’ and whether the interface has a direct monitoring function. Latency refers to the delay between the note being played, and the time it takes in getting back to your headphones or monitors. If the latency is too long, it can become difficult to stay in time with your recording. The Direct Monitoring feature allows you to bypass the computer, and hear yourself in real-time while you are recording, ensuring you stay in perfect time. This is especially useful for recording vocals.

How Much Does An Audio Interface For PC Cost?

As mentioned above, audio interfaces come in a wide range of configurations and sizes, which means that their price can vary widely. Fortunately, a small two-channel interface with a basic USB connection usually starts around $100 and can go up to around $400. As you increase the number of inputs and the quality of the outputs, you can spend several thousand dollars in added features, but that is not necessary to get started with your first recordings.

How Do I Start Recording With My Audio Interface?

Once you have an audio interface, the recording process is fairly simple. First, you need to connect your audio interface to your computer and open your DAW software to confirm that the computer is receiving sound. Connect your instruments and play a test track to make sure everything is working properly.

When you’re ready to start tracking a song, simply create a new track in your DAW and start the recording. Play the song as well as you can the first time through. When you’re done, listen to it and see if there are any problem areas that need to be fixed or played over. If so, you can re-record the same instrument multiple times and splice the tracks together to create the best version of the song. When you’re done with your instrument, you can add your vocals or other instruments in new tracks. Use the same process by playing back what you already recorded, easy!

As you get more comfortable with this process, you can adjust the gain and other features on your audio interface to create a more personalized sound in your recordings. You can also employ effects like delay and reverb to give your music a more finished sound.

Here’s a really helpful video on how to use an audio interface:



Summary

As you can see, an audio interface is an important component for any budding musician who hopes to record from home. Audio interfaces come in many sizes and styles, but there is a wealth of entry-level options that will allow you to get started recording right away with just a USB cable and the instruments you already have. You should now have all the information you need to shop for an audio interface to suit your recording needs.

 

Acoustic Vs Electric Guitar: A Complete Beginners Guide

Acoustic V Electric Guitar

As you set out on your journey of learning to play guitar, you will be faced with dozens of decisions, but perhaps the first decision you’ll have to make is what kind of guitar you want to buy. 

On the one hand, you’ve probably seen the glamorous and glitzy electric guitars played by rockstars the world over. On the other hand, you can’t miss the subtle beauty of a dreadnought style acoustic with its delicate Mother of Pearl inlays. So, how do you decide between acoustic vs electric when standing inside your local music shop?

Acoustic vs Electric Guitar: A Beginners Guide

Ed Sheeran or Eddie Van Halen?

Before we discuss the differences between acoustic and electric guitars, I feel that it is first important to think about your personal goals and musical interests. For instance, if you prefer classical guitar or country music, it is natural to gravitate towards an acoustic instrument. Younger people tend to prefer electric guitars for their flashy appeal and the wide range of sounds they can produce. We need to try and find the best beginner guitar for you and your situation.

There is no right or wrong answer when selecting a beginner guitar, and thousands of talented guitarists have found their way on each side. Just keep in mind that if you’re looking to play grunge rock, an acoustic guitar probably makes little sense for you, and vice versa.

We have a complete guide to finding ‘The Best Kids Guitar’ if you require any further help.

Body Types

The first thing you’ll notice about electric guitar vs acoustic is that they have very different body types. Most notably, acoustic guitars are known for their large bodies and natural wood finishes, while electric guitars feature slim bodies, usually with interesting cutaways that may or may not serve a purpose for playability. So you can see the parts of the guitar are very different in every way.

I always recommend that you go try out a wide range of different body styles to see what feels natural to you, but don’t despair if nothing feels quite right just yet. It does take a while to get your posture perfected, and you will probably feel like some body styles are just too bulky for you. That is totally normal! However, if you are really struggling to find a good fit, you should know that guitars come in many shapes and sizes.

A Quick Note on Guitar Sizing

Guitar shops are mostly filled to the brim with full-size guitars, but that is not the only option available. There are half-scale and 3/4-scale guitars as well. These guitars have been scaled down to fit younger learners while maintaining the proper proportions so you can move into a full-scale guitar with proper techniques already established.

The Difference In Sound

Electric

Aside from the distinct looks of an acoustic and electric guitar, they also differ in the way they produce sound. An electric guitar uses magnetic pickups mounted on the body beneath the strings to pick up the sound of the vibrating strings and send it to the amplifier. In this case, the amplifier is actually responsible for producing the bulk of the sound that you hear.

Acoustic

By contrast, an acoustic guitar is designed to produce a sound all on its own using the vibrations captured through the soundhole beneath the strings. Here, it is the construction of the acoustic guitar’s hollow body that is responsible for producing the sound you hear.

Now, you may wonder how an acoustic guitar could produce enough sound to fill an entire concert venue if it doesn’t use an amplifier? Fear not! Professional acoustic guitar players rely on tiny electric amplifiers built into the hollow body of their guitars. These pickups offer large-scale benefits of amplification without damaging the warm, natural tone that comes from playing acoustically.

For beginners, spending the extra money on an acoustic guitar with a built-in pickup is not strictly necessary, but you can find some affordable options that will give you more flexibility in your playing later on.

Strings

This is a good time to discuss the differences in strings when playing electric or acoustic guitar. Because an electric guitar uses an amplifier to produce a robust sound, it does not require very large strings.

Notes on a guitar are produced by pressing down on the strings at different intervals, changing the length of the string and the sound it produces. So, it stands to reason that the lighter weight strings in electric guitars are easier to press than their acoustic counterparts.

If you find that you are struggling to press the strings down to produce clear sound, or if you have small hands, an electric guitar is a great place to start.

With an acoustic, you need much thicker strings to produce a strong enough sound for the body to pick up. As a result, many young players struggle with acoustic guitars until they build up hand strength.

What Are Best Acoustic Guitar Strings For Beginners? Click here for our guide.

Playing Technique

Finding the right fit is the most important part of selecting the right type of guitar for you. The right fit has a lot to do with your comfort and strength. Yet there are also some differences in playing style. So far, I have focused on how your fretting hand is affected by the guitar you choose, but now we will look at your strumming hand.

Strumming Differences

The arm you strum the strings with rests on the “shoulder” or “body” of the guitar, and your strumming hand sits over the strings. This will probably feel uncomfortable as you adjust to the edges of the guitar pressing against you. You will become comfortable with practice.

With an electric guitar, the slimmer body style makes it easier to drop your arm over the strings. On an acoustic guitar, you have to prop your arm up at about shoulder height and rest it on the body. From there, you will have to strum across the strings to produce sound.

With an electric guitar, you don’t have to strum too hard because you can artificially change the volume with the help of your amplifier. On an acoustic guitar, the volume of the sound you produce is entirely dependent on how hard you strum. For those with short arms or little strength, producing a strong enough sound with an acoustic guitar can be challenging at first.

Don’t Get Distracted

Electric guitars provide many opportunities to get distracted from the music by adding effects, adjusting your amplifier, and dialing in your instrument. By contrast, the bare-bones nature of the acoustic makes it great for focusing all of your energies on playing technique and perfecting the music itself.

If you feel that you can learn proper playing techniques well on an electric, and you are committed to getting them right, that’s totally up to you. On the other hand, if you really want to be sure you build technique, and hand strength, an acoustic guitar might be just what you need to keep your practice time distraction-free.

Cost

A final consideration you might want to make is the cost. Both acoustic and electric guitars range from a few hundred dollars up to nearly ten thousand dollars. For a first-time guitar player, you can expect to spend at least a few hundred dollars to get started, although you might find second-hand guitars cheaper.

However, there may be one downside of starting with an electric guitar. You have to buy the instrument, the amplifier, and the cables to connect it. Fortunately, there are a few companies like Squier, that offer beginner packages that include a super starter pack that includes everything you need. This is usually a pretty good bargain for any new player and can save you a lot of headaches trying to build a complete setup. In general, you can find a starter kit for around $200, which is comparable to a low-end acoustic guitar.

On the other hand, if you choose to go with an acoustic, all you really need is the guitar itself. Obviously, you do need to purchase a decent tuner with both acoustic and electric guitars. But you may choose to buy a strap as well, which will help you hold the guitar up even when you are sitting, but it is not required.

The Verdict: Acoustic Vs Electric Guitar

The question I hear a lot is “should I start with an acoustic or electric guitar?”

Is electric guitar easier than acoustic to learn? No, they’re completely different animals. Two different instruments. Neither is ‘easier’ to learn than the other. It’s all about personal preference. Hopefully, we’ve helped you more with your decision

For most people and playing styles, the electric guitar is a great beginner option. It is versatile and easy to learn while you’re building hand strength, and more comfortable for new players. In addition, with the starter packs available today, you can find a complete electric guitar setup at a very affordable price. You can even begin to learn the ins and outs of modifying your guitar sound early on.

If you do prefer a more classical sound, you are always free to start on an acoustic instrument instead. You may find that there is a variety of sizes available. If you go this route, be sure to consider changing to lighter strings. New guitars generally come with a poor standard of strings attached. So, give yourself the best chance to succeed when you start and buy some decent strings. Here are some to get you started: ‘Best Acoustic Guitar Strings For Beginners

Here’s some valuble tips from the National Guitar Academy if you need further advice.

Let your journey begin!

17 Famous Guitar Riffs You Need To Hear

Famous Riffs Header

Sometimes the riff in a song has more effect on the listener than the song itself. Nothing feels better than hearing big fat chunky famous guitar riffs. Or a riff that takes you to a golden memory. Without guitar riffs, the world would be a pretty boring place. Imagine no air guitar! 

To qualify for our 17 Famous Guitar Riffs it’s pretty simple. The melody has to be memorable and make us tap our foot.

It’s almost impossible to write one article on the best riffs of all time (i could create a whole website on it) so let’s look into some of the most recognized and enjoyable to listen to. Being a guitarist of 25 years myself, I’d like to share with you some of the most enjoyable riffs I’ve learned and played along with. Maybe you could share yours?

Let’s get influenced and learn some new riffs. I’ve left out the complete obvious riffs as I’d like to branch out a bit further. But only a little!

What Do We Like In A Classic Guitar Riff?

Firstly, it has to be memorable. Sometimes without even realizing it, we’re subconsciously taking the riff in. We’ll be walking around later humming it to ourselves. That’s where the genius of the guitarist has got you. The hook is what musicians call it.

Classic guitar riffs are a piece of music that is instantly recognizable or enjoyable to listen to. Some riffs are so powerful they can define a generation. Let’s dig a little deeper. A riff doesn’t need to be a sequence of single notes and a melody, it can also be a group of chords. You know Nirvana’s ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’ right? That’s a riff too. 

It’s scientifically proven that there are major benefits to playing guitar that affect your whole wellbeing. Yes, it’s true, check out the proof ‘The Fascinating Benefits Of Playing Guitar’.

There’s also a very important quality when playing riffs. You gotta look like a god playing them! Look at Jimmy Page, Slash, Hendrix, Chuck Berry, Brian May, Lenny Kravitz, Angus Young, and Marty McFly! Swagger, you can’t be taught that. Let’s plug you into some of the best guitarists doing what they do best. Banging out riffs.

Foot Tapping Rating

I’ve rated the riffs on my foot tapping scale from 1-10. They are in no particular order, just 17 riffs that make you wanna tap your foot or crowd surf through your lounge.

I’ve Separated our Greatest Guitar Riffs into three sections:

  • Acoustic
  • Soft Rock
  • Rock/Hard Rock

That’s enough talk, let’s get into some bangers:

Famous Guitar Riffs: Acoustic

Tears in Heaven-Eric Clapton

Foot Tapping Score: 5/10 

Everybody knows this hook. It’s a very sentimental song for Eric Clapton. The intro riff is so very memorable and the brilliant guitar playing continues throughout the song on his classical guitar. Definitely worth a watch.



Heart Shaped Box-Nirvana

Foot Tapping Score: 5/10

Nirvana could have made it onto all three of my riff criteria. This version of ‘Heart-Shaped Box’ is played on acoustic, unlike the original. Kurt picks through the chords and comes up with a very simple but memorable melody. This is a version that you need to hear. Ladies and Gentleman, the super talented Kurt Cobain.



Use Me-Bill Withers

Foot Tapping Score: 8/10

Trust me, you need this riff in your life.

I’m not sure there is a better groove in music. Although not a guitar riff, the groove and melody on the keys are truly undisputed. What a super talent Bill Withers was. One of my very favorite musicians. Within 5 secs I’ll have you tapping your foot, guaranteed. 

Press play and be enlightened



Shape Of My Heart-Sting

Foot Tapping Score: 4/10 

It’s been covered so many times, but there’s a reason for that, it’s an incredible song with a memorable hook in the intro. This is easily the most beautiful riff on the list. This version is a must-watch. Just Sting and his guitarist. Low foot-tapping score but the most peaceful song on our list. 



Solsbury Hill-Peter Gabriel

Foot Tapping Score: 7/10

What a great riff in the intro, the acoustic continues throughout the song in the same vein. Brilliant 12 string guitar playing by Steve Hunter (on the original record). It was difficult to find a good video of the acoustic, so this clip is perfect to show you how good the guitar playing is on this riff. Enjoy



*Its time to turn up!

Famous Guitar Riffs: Soft Rock

Paperback Writer-The Beatles

Foot Tapping Score: 8/10

In classic Beatles fashion, the fab four begin with tight 3-way harmonies, then burst into this meaty riff. Great tune from the best band ever. 



Crossroads-Eric Clapton

Foot Tapping Score: 7/10

Eric’s got more than a few riffs tucked up his sleeve. I just love the guitar playing on the intro to crossroads. It’s also a good listen for bass players as Jack Bruce is all over the fretboard.



La Grange-ZZ Top

Foot Tapping Score: 8/10

Is there a cooler riff out there? This is the essence of chill. Old School blues riff in A but when the band comes in its high on the foot-tapping richter scale. Texas Finest, these boys are still gigging. Heroes! I just love Billy Gibbons’s voice. 

You’ll need a shower after listening to this. The riff is so dirty:



Crosstown Traffic-Jimi Hendrix

Foot Tapping Score: 8/10

Nearly didn’t make it onto Electric Ladyland! Can you imagine if we’d of never been able to feast our ears on this riff from Jimi? Great tune, guitars doubling up on the intro riff. Did you know Jimi sang the “do do do do do dooo do’ through a comb with cellophane wrapped around it?

The unmistakable Rock God Jimi Hendrix. We’ve got a lot to thank him for.

Money For Nothing-Dire Straits

Foot Tapping Score: 7/10

Probably the hardest one to play (properly) on our list. A mixture of several fingers picking at different times and clever use of pinched harmonics make this riff so memorable and showcases Knopfler’s brilliant ability on the guitar. Truly one of the best guitarists ever. Not many people haven’t heard this beaut. He has a few more but this is probably Knopfler’s strongest riff.



Message In A Bottle-The Police

Foot Tapping Score: 8/10

It helps to have a brilliant drummer when you’re writing riffs in a band. One of the best live 3-piece bands ever. Superbly written, unorthodox riff by Sting. You gotta have long fingers to play this one. Here’s a live version I love. Stuart Copeland is the man on this footage!



HEALTH WARNING: Earplugs may be required for the following videos:

Famous Guitar Riffs: Rock/Hard Rock

Freedom-Rage Against The Machine

Foot Tapping Score: 8/10

Now, this is a riff! Start as you mean to go on. These guys were legendary in the riff department. Literally, one after another, sometimes five or six in one song! What a band, lifting roofs off venues since 1991. This may not be your cup of tea but RATM was the Daddy when it came to the guitar riff. Check out minute 2:34 & 3:40 for more beasty riffs! You get your money’s worth with RATM.

Here’s one beast ive chosen from many:



Beat It-Michael Jackson

Foot Tapping Score: 9/10

The Late great Eddie Van Halen played ‘that’ iconic solo for MJ’s monster hit, Beat it. This Riff is a monster in terms of popularity. Such good fun to play, it’s memorable, chunky and you’ve got the best vocalist ever singing over it. One of the best guitar riffs of all time. Amazing tune and well worthy of a mention. 



Stone Cold Crazy-Queen

Foot Tapping Score: 9/10

In my opinion, the best live band ever. What a belter from Brian. A super-fast riff and certainly no walk in the park to learn. These guys were as tight as a skin on a grape. Possibly the best frontman ever in Freddie Mercury. The man is English royalty. Here’s some powerful Queen footage back in the early days: 



Thunderstruck-AC/DC

Foot Tapping Score: 10/10

You didn’t expect a famous guitar riff article without Angus, did you? Any live footage of Angus is worth watching. The masters of the power chord, AC/DC had riff after riff. I decided on Thunderstruck but I could choose from 75+ riffs. It almost sounds like its played on a violin. If we ever needed a (National) Anthem for planet Earth, here it is. Angus, we salute YOU.



Foo Fighters-All My Life

Foot Tapping Score: 9/10

The more simple it is, the more it resonates with your audience. Dave Grohl starts off chugging on one note but when the band comes in, it’s HUGE. RIP eardrums. I actually prefer the muted riff on the verse but there’s some pretty powerful music here. 100mph band and soooo good live. Foo Fighters have many meaty riffs and are truly worthy of Rock Gods. I mean, Grohl’s been in not one. but two of the biggest bands ever. That’s just greedy.



Kashmir-Led Zeppelin

Foot Tapping Score: 9/10

By far the best band to play riffs along with (if you can!) About 150 riffs to choose from. Nobody can construct a riff like the master Jimmy Page. Undoubtedly one of the best guitarists of all time. Helped along by a brilliant drummer and bassist. They really are the creator of The Guitar Riff. Difficult to find footage suitable enough for this clip as its very old. That shouldn’t take away the fact Zepp was one of the biggest bands in the world. Rightly so. Special mention to Bonzo on drums, without him Zep’s riffs just wouldn’t be as meaty. Riffmiesters Supreme!



Eye Of The Tiger- Survivor

Foot Tapping Score: 10/10

Come on, you know you love it. Who doesn’t bang their head to this brute of a riff? I know it’s cheesy but I love it. Survivor created a riff so good, it’s used in many situations where energy, positivity, and guts are required. Would the Rocky films be as successful without Survivor doing the soundtracks? The 1980s is a gold mine for rock bands and riffs. Great band. There are some really nice mullets in the video. Enjoy



Winner

Lenny Kravitz-Are You Gonna Go My Way

Foot Tapping Score: 11/10 (Amps go up to 11 so why can’t my scoring system?)

From the very first note, you’re tapping your foot, I love this simplistic riff. Shades of Hendrix’s Voodoo Child, which makes me like it even more. 

I used to play this in a band. It was so much fun to play, for all the musicians. The doubled-up riff in the intro is right up there with the best riffs ever. Again, you all know it. Fast-paced, heart-thumping rock guitars and harmony riff. It has all the ingredients of a true rock riff (it helps to look as cool as Lenny too). 

Just a side note, Craig Ross’s guitar solo in this also got voted one of the best in history. Wow, what a tune. Go On Lenny! 

Here’s an awesome live version, it’s worth watching just to see Lenny’s jacket and shiny gold Flying V.  



That’s it, go give your ringing ears a rest! 

I apologize for missing out on so many artists, guitarists, and riffs. As I said, I could build a complete website around famous guitar riffs. These were the riffs that get me going. 

I’d love to hear your thoughts on other riffs and musicians. Feel free to add yours. That’s the beauty of music. Opinion. 

If you’re still hungry for more, here’s a great selection of rolling stone top 100 guitarists and 100 more riffs here at 100 Greatest Rock Guitar Riffs

Our friends over at Listening Through The Lens do a great ‘Top 100 Most Essential Folk Songs’. Go check it out